Artis v. D.C.: A Small Case That Vastly Expands Federal Power

The Supplemental Jurisdiction statute, 28 U.S.C. § 1367, enacted in 1990, permits federal district courts to hear state-law claims not ordinarily within federal jurisdiction if those claims are part of the same case or controversy as a claim within the federal court’s jurisdiction. In the event the federal court declines jurisdiction of the state-law claims, subsection (d) of § 1367 tolls the state-law statutes of limitations while the case is pending in federal court and for 30 days thereafter, permitting litigants to refile the dismissed claims in state court. The question in Artis v. District of Columbia (United States Supreme Court, Jan. 22, 2018) was the meaning of the word “tolled” in § 1367(d).

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D.C. v. Wesby: "Lurid Optics" Overwhelm Case

In District of Columbia v. Wesby (U.S. Supreme Court, Jan. 22, 2018), the claim was false arrest.  The result was 9-0 in favor of the police (the District of Columbia's Metropolitan Police Department).  Apparently the arrestees conceded the unfavorable facts initially in their opposition to the petition for writ of certiorari.  As a result, the arrestees waived their right to challenge those facts later in their merits brief, under the Supreme Court’s Rule 15.2. 

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